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Mpg, I40

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Not once, regardless of how economically I have driven the car, have I managed 50 mpg overall on any tank of fuel despite on occasions seeing number in the high 50s on the instant mpg indicator.  Mid-40s is about the mark for the i40 if driven fairly gently on open roads, occasionally rising to high 40s in summer.  For anyone to see better returns would require lots of miles every tank on billiard table-flat road at speeds under 60 mph in 6th gear and no traffic work.  For auto models, I can't imagine seeing better than low 40s at best and low 30s far more often.

 

 

Here's some of my gauge figures, as a comparison, I assume you never see figures like these...

 

Not a fully accurate representation - from fill up to a local out of town shopping area - mostly single lane, national speed limit, softly undulating, quiet road so pretty much averaged 60mph over the 6.9 miles

 

post-1036-0-01793200-1386845378.jpg

 

And after a 180 or so mile, rush hour, motorway and town commute to and from a client's office.  Kept up with traffic 70/80mph with about 5 miles of town driving at each end - with about 70kg of flat pack kitchen cupboards and 34kg of dog food in the back!!!

 

post-1036-0-93022600-1386845433.jpg

 

I know I have the BlueDrive model, but my average mpg, since I bought my i40 in September, over the 10,000 miles I've covered is a tad over 50mpg - calculated, not using the gauge (<- my complete fuel logs are updated).  I fill up at a variety of petrol stations, but mostly either BP or Sainsbuirys, with an occasional Esso or Morrisons.  The number of fill-ups negates any 'errors' in 'brimming' or not.  Since my last service however, mpg has markedly improved...

 

Have you considered that something might be wrong?  Have you mentioned it to your dealer?

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Most recent tank - ~740 miles of all local, stop/start, rarely above 30mph has still returned 48.4mpg... I think that's about as bad as I can make it without trying!!! 

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After 755 gently-driven miles, mostly on open A roads with a little motorway driving, my car returned 47.5 mpg on a brim to brim basis. Driven the same way, my old A6 with 4WD wasn't too far short of that but with that car, I at least had the option of driving really quickly if I wanted to!

Indalo

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I think you need to push them on that Indalo, I get nearly that mpg with that kind of driving in the 1.6 petrol model, I know that my average is about 30 on the logger but as I explained before that is down to the majority of driving I do (which makes a diesel a less favourable option due to clogging the DPF), however you can see on my trip from Aberdeen-Durham-Aberdeen last summer that I was close to your mpg and I would expect the diesel version to be giving much better figures than mine!

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Filled my tank with Esso today @ 134.9p per litre, 1p dearer than the local supermarkets, got my Tesco club card points and did the arithmetic.

 

75.06 litres were required to brim the tank and my trip was 722.4 miles.  That computes to, más o menos, 43.72 mpg which I find disappointing as the winter temperatures haven't been particularly cold.

 

Indalo

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Gutted!  After filling up with Esso today @ 133.9p/ltr, I forgot to get my Tesco clubcard points.  I'll probably get over it....eventually!

 

For what it'a worth, 684.2 miles, consuming 65.3 ltrs of derv, produced a return of 47.63 mpg on a brim-brim basis.  Big service coming up on Wednesday and bodywork repairs the following week.  When the car is returned to me after the paint job, I shall report on the effectiveness of Hyundai First in that regard.

 

Indalo

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785 miles / 75.66 litres = 47.16 mpg.........I can see a pattern emerging here!

 

Indalo

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46.3 out of the ix35 I am currently driving. Not that far off what I am getting with the i40 at the minute, well when I say this minute !!!!

 

M...  

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See my i40 @ 40k thread for my total average mpg over nearly 30k miles. Just a tad over 50...

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk

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817.4 miles with little stop-start traffic work.

 

74.77 litres Shell to refill

 

49.69 mpg.......close but no cigar!

 

 

Indalo

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817.4 miles with little stop-start traffic work.

 

74.77 litres Shell to refill

 

49.69 mpg.......close but no cigar!

 

 

Indalo

What's the mileage on your i40 now?

I'm hoping it improves as the engine becomes a little less tight.

Mine has been into my dealer yesterday for poor fuel economy as I'm getting around 41mpg but vehicle only has 3k on it at the moment.

Was told by service that the readings on the diagnostic machine were all within Hyundai specification and that the engine had been flushed and oil replaced.

Funny thing is that when I asked for my work report print off it had no mention of any oil change just the diagnostics testing.

I then questioned the service manager and wouldn't you of guessed it !

There had been a mistake and it didn't actually have an engine flush.

Hoping it improves as time goes on but I'm going to start having checks done and reports kept as you never know

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What's the mileage on your i40 now?

I'm hoping it improves as the engine becomes a little less tight.

 

Without popping out to check, I think it's probably near to 16,000 miles now Andy.

 

If yours has only covered 3,000, you can expect to see some improvement over the next few thousand miles as the engine loosens up.  There has been marginal, rather than significant improvement in mine as the mileage has grown but that's to be expected with all IC engines.  My gripe with the economy is, and has always been, that the best I can achieve from the i40 is miles further away from the 'official' figures than any car I have ever owned.  None ever got particularly close, which is to be expected in real-world motoring as opposed to lab conditions, but a few were at least in reasonable proximity, such that I never felt like complaining about it.

 

That Hyundai made such a selling feature of the astonishingly frugal economy of the i40 range was wholly misleading but I shan't bore you with my views on that again.  Suffice to say that, driven carefully and sticking to speed limits, high 40s can be extracted from the i40, even with plentiful use of the air-con.

 

I'm guessing that if your returns were similar to mine, you'd be reasonably satisfied but local conditions affect the numbers considerably.  Those whose cars spend lots of time on motorways and fast A roads achieve much better mpg than I can manage with my driving profile.  If I were using the i40 to cover my daily commute within London from the years before retirement, I'm sure I'd see no better than low 40s, possibly less at times.

 

The trouble with these car forums is that you always get a few people who cannot tell the truth, feeling some need to express themselves by embellishing mpg, acceleration ability and so on, lest anyone thinks them fools for choosing that particular car.  The truth about all these matters is found from reading all the journalistic reports available, reading the official figures and test-driving your choice(s).  Simply stating on a forum that the i40, (for example) is the best car someone has ever owned doesn't really mean anything as we haven't a clue which other cars they have ever had!

 

Equally, such comments as 'The acceleration's terrific' mean nothing in themselves so these forums are unlikely to produce much, if any, meaningful, forensic commentary.  Among my favourites are, 'I find the headlights really good.' and 'The suspension is excellent and the car is ever so comfortable on a run.'.  If the headlights are good, I just imagine that person only ever drives in daylight or where there is plentiful street lighting.  As for the suspension, surely I'm not the only one who finds it a little disappointing being less supple than the Mondeo or the Passat to give two examples.  Perhaps it rides better on the 16" wheels but I have never had a drive in one of those so I can't say.

 

Anyway Andy, I'm sure you will notice some improvement over the next year if you keep the car but the mpg you have been recording is disappointing, all the more so when you can easily get as much and quite a lot more from many more powerful cars.

 

Indalo

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Hi All,

Just a quick update on my MPG after about 6 months of ownership. I originally had some bad experiences with the fuel economy. However, I've had a chance to try a few economy runs (mainly on quite flat A roads, 55 - 60 MPH, including two or three 60 mile trips) and I've managed to get some pretty good figures while driving in a boring way.

 

I was getting 73.3 MPG on my trip computer after about 25 miles. 

 

By the end of the tank, I had averaged 62.3 MPG according to the trip computer.

 

Cheers,

 

DC

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Here's an interesting real world comparison.  Since the accident with my i40, I've been driving a Renault Megane DCi 110 Estate.  I've covered almost 1,200 miles in my usual pattern...

 

I'm incredibly disappointed by it's economy.  It's a smaller, lighter car than the i40, but my real world fuel consumption compared to the manufacturers figures is even worse than Hyundais!! (Manufacturrs figures from the government website - http://carfueldata.direct.gov.uk/downloads/download.aspx?rg=aug2013)

 

 

Hyundai i40 Premium Bluedrive

 

Manufacturer - combined cycle = 62.8mpg

My Real World = 50.47mpg

 

Renault Megane Sports Tourer DCi 110

 

Manufacturer - combined cycle = 67.5mpg

My real world = 51.9mpg!

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Not uncommon with Renault I am afraid, the Captur is in the top ten of cars not being able to acheive the claimed figures and that is a brand new model with the three cylinder engine.

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Do any of you drive an AT? There is no such option in fuel log app to distinguish MT and AT. I drive mostly in the city or 90mph at the highway but still my 33.6 MPG is disappointing. Especially that I tend to drive very economically comparing to others. 

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 I drive mostly in the city or 90mph at the highway but still my 33.6 MPG is disappointing. Especially that I tend to drive very economically comparing to others. 

 

I'm not familiar with the fuel returns of the auto-transmission model although, from memory, we have at least one member, Ex-aviator, who enjoys that particular pleasure.  Perhaps if he looks in and sees this thread, he can advise from his own experience.

 

Having said that, driving at 90mph on main roads allied to city traffic most of the time isn't the best recipe for good fuel consumption so I'm minded to say that your figure seems realistic given that profile.

 

Indalo

 

ps   Welcome to the forum Jacfry!

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Filled up with Shell today at St Albans: 724 miles recorded; computer read 51.4 mpg but the arithmetic showed a true figure of 47 and a bit mpg which is consistent with previous tankfuls this year.

 

Indalo

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As Indalo indicated, I own a diesel i40 automatic. I accelerate and corner reasonably 'hard' as could be expected of a former military fast jet pilot. As I'm now retired this driving mainly involves local journeys in the Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridge area with a relatively high traffic density. However, there are also a fair number of longer journeys mainly travelling on motorways. I note Jacfry lives in Poland. In the UK there are spot speed cameras, average speed recorders, and an ever increasing number of automatic number plate readers. In this environment, as with most drivers in the UK who wish to retain their licence, I do not  exceed speed limits significantly including those on motorways (70mph). Hence my days of happily cruising at 90-100mph plus have been consigned to history!

 

For my first 10,000 miles from new, I recorded just under 40mpg. By 13,000 miles this had crept up to 42mpg. Now at over 15,000 miles I'm achieving 45mpg but I would suspect this will not improve further. These rates of consumption are not brilliant but not too dissimilar to other cars of this size, weight and capacity.

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Today I've noticed (using OBD2 interface) that using "auto hold" during heavy traffic is not a way to save fuel. Keeping the break pedal pressed while in D reduces the engine load (torque converter slippage drops form 790 to about 45 rpm) after a couple of seconds. It's about the same as putting it into P. Using "auto hold" keeps engine at load and the torque converter slippage is equal to idle rpm, that is slightly below 800rpm. I don't expect it to be noticeable in real driving conditions but I'm going to try using break while not moving.

 

As I probably mentioned before using cruise control seems to lower the fuel usage at the same speed according to the fuel efficiency meter on a display. I will investigate it further with the OBD2 interface just from curiosity. 

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Well, after a little over 2 years' ownership, I have finally broken through the 50mpg 'barrier' over the course of a tankful with my i40.

 

Today, I refilled with 67.09 litres of Shell after 767 and a bit miles.  That gave me true consumption of 52.01 mpg which betters my previous best by a fair margin.  I'm not sure why that should be as my driving profile over those 700 miles was in keeping with my typical pattern.  The mileage is up around 18,000 from memory but really, that shouldn't alter anything much as the engine was run-in and nicely settled quite a few thousand miles ago.

 

The weather is turning cooler so I don't expect to match that figure over the next few months but I'll be delighted if I get close to that figure.

 

Indalo

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Although a US court has previously convicted Hyundai over their lies in regard to fuel consumption figures, the American regulators have gone even further under the Clean Air Act:

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-29887117

 

European legislation and testing procedures need to be revised to stop all these lying carmakers hoodwinking potential buyers with artificially produced mpg and CO2 figures.  It appears that all the big car manufacturers are 'at it' and they do it because they know we all want to buy clean, economical cars out of environmental and economic concerns.  They also do it because they know they can get away with it!

 

One can read that the US authorities used a figure of 6 mpg exaggeration in securing a conviction and if that doesn't seem like a lot, remember that the US gallon is smaller than our imperial gallon.  The figure is probably much higher than that but it might have been more difficult to prove without major scientific input and lengthy research.  Had Hyundai further challenged the regulator's figures, the costs would have escalated and Hyundai themselves would have ultimately had to pay many millions of dollars more.

 

Indalo

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As discussed on USA forums.

Although we can't get the fuel vouchers that US customers can get when serviced by Hyundai to help make up the difference.

The 2 stroke oil trick does work. Although I have not been brave enough to use the cheapest method of using two stroke I'm using the Lucas upper cylinder lubricant and have already seen an increase of 3mpg after my first tank useage.

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The 2 stroke oil trick does work. Although I have not been brave enough to use the cheapest method of using two stroke I'm using the Lucas upper cylinder lubricant and have already seen an increase of 3mpg after my first tank useage.

 

Engine fuel improvers, whether for petrol or diesel, have been around all my life.  The first one I can remember was Redex but through my life fixing and repairing cars for my living, I think I probably tried all the magic potions available.  

 

In my experience, none of them ever got near to producing the improvements in performance or economy claimed in the advertising guff.  Given the price of some of these potions, one might expect that they would show noticeable benefits but even under lab test conditions, a selection of them failed to do so when one or other of the major motoring publications (I can't remember which) tried them out.  In some cases, power actually fell after adding the 'improver'.

 

I don't know if any still do it but years ago, many truckers added a little petrol to their  diesel tanks every time they filled up because they reckoned the diesel didn't turn waxy in winter plus they claimed the engines felt better for it?  Today, all fuels are hugely better than they were back in the 1950s and our engines don't need decoked which they really did from time to time back then.

 

One of the problems with these additives is that they have a premium price for a small bottle and we would all like to imagine that they must work or they couldn't get away with charging so much. Unfortunately, that creates a measure of anticipation and we start paying attention to our engine, feeling if it accelerates faster; we check the rear-view mirror for smoke, we check and double-check the fuel consumption at the next couple of fill-ups and because we have so conditioned ourselves psychologically, we convince ourselves that their is tangible improvement.

 

A slightly cheaper, though unnecessary, form of fuel treatment is available to us in most filling stations in the form of the premium fuels, costing typically 5-7pence per litre over the regular flavour.  It might produce a mile or two per gallon better economy (but you've paid for it) and might give the impression that the engine runs sweeter but again, there is a psychological dimension to that because we want it to work and we expect something for the extra money.

 

Apart from the maufacturers' claims for these products, there is no real evidence to prove they are a worthwhile purchase.  My personal choice in keeping things sweet is simply to use branded fuel most of the time although I have no qualms about using supermarket fuel occasionally.  Maybe once or twice a year, I'll do a full tank of the expensive stuff but I always use fully synthetic oil, (have done for years) and of course, Hyundai use that in our i40s anyway. 

 

The best fuel economy device I know is the one at the bottom of your right leg.

 

Indalo

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